Multimodality Monitoring in Acute Brain Injury

  • Kristine H. O’Phelan
  • Halinder S. Mangat
  • Stephen E. Olvey
  • M. Ross Bullock
Chapter

Abstract

Major advances in microelectronics have produced new techniques for monitoring the injured brain; some, such as ion sensitive microelectrodes and continuous single-photon microscopy, remain confined to animal studies; others have transitioned rapidly into clinical use, including: Microdialysis Thermal dilution blood flow monitoring Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

Keywords

Microelectronics Injured brain Neuromonitoring Serial neurologic exams ICP monitoring TCD EEG Parenchymal brain tissue Brain temperature monitoring Pupillometry cEEG Spectral analysis BIS monitoring Jugular bulb venous oxygen saturation Cerebral microdialysis NIRS Laser Doppler flowmetry Thermodilution flowmetry 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kristine H. O’Phelan
    • 1
  • Halinder S. Mangat
    • 1
  • Stephen E. Olvey
    • 1
  • M. Ross Bullock
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyUniversity of Miami Miller School of MedicineMiamiUSA
  2. 2.Department of Neurological SurgeryUniversity of Miami Miller School of MedicineMiamiUSA

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