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Classification Trees for a Binary Response

  • Heping Zhang
  • Burton H. Singer
Chapter
Part of the Springer Series in Statistics book series (SSS, volume 0)

Abstract

In this chapter we discuss the technical aspect of the recursive partitioning technique, following the brief introduction from Chapter 2. This chapter, particularly the less technical parts of it, is helpful for understanding the methodological and theoretical aspects of recursive partitioning as well as for efficiently and correctly using the computer software. For clarity, we concentrate on the simplest case—a binary response. However, the basic framework of recursive partitioning is established here.

Keywords

Root Node Internal Node Terminal Node Complexity Parameter Binary Response 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology and Public HealthYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA
  2. 2.Emerging Pathogens InstituteUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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