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The Right to a Family Environment for Children of Prisoners

  • Robin Kimbrough-Melton
Chapter
Part of the The Loyola University Symposium on the Human Rights of Children book series (LUSY, volume 1)

Abstract

As the “natural environment for the growth and well-being” of children (Convention on the Rights of the Child, 1989, preamble), the family has long enjoyed special protection within international human rights law (e.g. International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, 1976, art. 23 & 24; International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights, 1976, art. 10; Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948). However, the concept of the family environment as the optimal setting for the development of children first appears in the Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989). The Convention recognizes that the “child ….should grow up in a family environment, in an atmosphere of happiness, love and understanding” (preamble). To achieve this objective, the Convention directs governments to provide “necessary protection and assistance” to families so that they can fully assume their responsibilities within the community (preamble). These responsibilities include preparing children to be full participants in society.

Keywords

Criminal Justice System Family Environment Strong Community Parental Incarceration Child Separation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute on Family and Neighborhood LifeClemson UniversityGreenvilleUSA

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