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Technoscientific Diplomacy: The Practice of International Politics in the ASTER Collaboration

  • Dan Plafcan
Chapter
Part of the Remote Sensing and Digital Image Processing book series (RDIP, volume 11)

Abstract

Most chapters in this volume focus on the scientific and technical aspects of the design, performance, operations, and applications of the MODIS and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instruments. In contrast, this final chapter focuses on politics – specifically, the politics of technical decision making and scientific judgment. When scientific objectives, engineering design decisions, and familiar forms of scientific and technical authority are uncertain or otherwise unsettled, how do they become certain and settled? What facilitates collective judgment and the exercise of power in efforts to advance and achieve common scientific goals, especially in the international arena?

Keywords

Spectral Coverage Science Team Thermal Band Scientific Judgment Earth Observe System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Science, Technology, and Society, School of Engineering and Applied ScienceUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA

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