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Oh Sputnik! How the Educationists Prospered from a Russian Satellite

  • James T. Bennett
Chapter

Abstract

On October 4, 1957, the Soviet Sputnik 1, a 184-pound artificial satellite, orbited the earth. This was not wholly unexpected; watchers of the skies and the Soviets knew that the USSR and the United States had hoped to send such projectiles into space to mark the International Geophysical Year (IGY). The Soviets got there first with the “Artificial Fellow Traveler Around the Earth,” as Sputnik was clumsily translated.

Keywords

Federal Government Federal Control International Geophysical Year Federal Subsidy Edward Teller 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

  1. 1.
    Robert A. Divine, The Sputnik Challenge (New York: Oxford University Press, 1993), p. xiv.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Tom Wolfe, The Right Stuff (New York: Bantam, 1980), pp. 56–57.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Golf rounds courtesy of Eisenhower Presidential Library, Abilene, Kansas.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Quoted in The Politics of American Science: 1939 to the Present, p. 209.Google Scholar
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    Quoted in Divine, The Sputnik Challenge, p. xv.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Paul Dickson, Sputnik: The Shock of the Century (New York: Walker & Company, 2001), p. 112.Google Scholar
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    Quoted in ibid., pp. 120, 117, 204, 118.Google Scholar
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    Quoted in Divine, The Sputnik Challenge, p. 98.Google Scholar
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  10. 10.
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    Quoted in Divine, The Sputnik Challenge, pp. xiv–xv.Google Scholar
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    Quoted in Divine, The Sputnik Challenge, pp. viii, xvi, 7, 15, 16. Divine provides an excellent survey of contemporary responses to Sputnik.Google Scholar
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    Quoted in ibid., p. 20.Google Scholar
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    Ibid., pp. 29, 31.Google Scholar
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    Quoted in ibid., pp. 73–74, 77.Google Scholar
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    National Defense Education Act of 1958, U.S. Statutes P.L. 85–864.Google Scholar
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    Quoted in The Politics of American Science: 1939 to the Present, p. 210.Google Scholar
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    Dwight D. Eisenhower, “Statement by the President Upon Signing the National Defense Education Act,” September 2, 1958, The American Presidency Project, http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws.
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    McDougall, “Technocracy and Statecraft in the Space Age – Toward the History of a Saltation,” p. 1025.Google Scholar
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    Quoted in Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space (New York: Random House, 1994), p. 169.Google Scholar
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    Quoted in Howard E. McCurdy, The Space Station Decision: Incremental Politics and Technological Choice (Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1990), p. 13.Google Scholar
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    John F. Kennedy, “Special Message to Congress on Urgent National Needs,” May 25, 1961, http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws.
  58. 58.
    Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space, p. 161.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EconomicsGeorge Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA

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