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American Science before the Bomb

  • James T. Bennett
Chapter

Abstract

The patronage of science by the new national government was barely even an afterthought in the Constitutional Convention of 1787. On September 14, in the final week of the conclave, James Madison of Virginia and Charles Pinckney of South Carolina moved to give the Congress the power “to establish an University.”1 There appears to have been very little debate on the matter –– or perhaps Madison, who took the most detailed notes, suffered from carpal tunnel syndrome –– and the motion was defeated, with four states (Pennsylvania, Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina) in favor, six (New Hampshire, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and Georgia) opposed, and Connecticut divided. (The majority of New York’s delegation had left town, and Rhode Island never sent anyone to Philadelphia.)

Keywords

Federal Government Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Astronomical Observatory American Science Large Telescope 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EconomicsGeorge Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA

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