Ovarian Tumors



Ovarian pathology can present in a variety of ways including abdominal pain, abdominal mass, abnormal vaginal bleeding, precocious puberty, and on routine antenatal ultrasound. Because the ovary is composed of epithelial, sex cord-stromal and germ cell elements, there are many different neoplastic and non-neoplastic conditions that may develop. Fortunately, the majority of these lesions in children are benign, and a rational differential diagnosis and treatment plan can be developed based on the patient’s age, presenting symptoms, and the appearance on initial diagnostic imaging.


Germ Cell Tumor Precocious Puberty Mature Teratoma Ovarian Torsion Immature Teratoma 

Suggested Reading

  1. Morowitz M, Huff D, von Allmen D. Epithelial ovarian tumors in ­children: a retrospective analysis. J Pediatr Surg. 2003;38(3):331–5.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Pomeranz AJ, Sabnis S. Misdiagnoses of ovarian masses in children and adolescents. Pediatr Emerg Care. 2004;20(3):172–4.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Schultz KA, Ness KK, Nagarajan R, Steiner ME. Adnexal masses in infancy and childhood. Clin Obstet Gynecol. 2006;49(3):464–79.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Templeman CL, Fallat ME. In: Grosfeld JL, O’Neill JA, Coran AG, Fonkalsrud EW, editors. Ovarian tumors: Pediatric surgery. 6th edn. Philadelphia: Mosby Elsevier; 2006. p. 593–621.Google Scholar
  5. Ulbright TM. Germ cell tumors of the gonads: a selective review emphasizing problems in differential diagnosis, newly appreciated, and controversial issues. Mod Pathol. 2005;18 Suppl 2:S61–79.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. von Allmen D. Malignant lesions of the ovary in childhood. Semin Pediatr Surg. 2005;14(2):100–5.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Thomas Jefferson School of MedicineAlfred I. DuPont Hospital for ChildrenWilmingtonUSA

Personalised recommendations