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Historical Observations on European Archaeology

  • Sarunas Milisauskas
Chapter
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

In the second half of the nineteenth century, prehistoric archaeology came into existence in Europe (Daniel 1964:9). Since then numerous excavations have been conducted, thousands of publications covering various topics have been published, and new theories and methods have been applied to archaeological research. From a small number of pioneering scholars the profession has grown to include the thousands of men and women who are responsible for the present standing of archaeology in Europe. Unfortunately histories of archaeology do not treat all archaeologists equally. Each archaeologist writing the history of the field chooses his/her examples of events and personalities, so a totally unbiased perspective does not exist. Most archaeologists would agree that Marija Gimbutas (1921–1994) was a famous archaeologist (Milisauskas 2000); however, in Trigger’s (1989), A History of Archaeological Thought, she was not included. A list of archaeologists associated with greatness may be quite different in England from one in Russia.

Keywords

Archaeological Research Landscape Archaeology Archaeological Culture Processual Archaeology British Archaeologist 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyState University of New YorkBuffaloUSA

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