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Workshop Summary: Functions of the TNF Family in Infectious Disease

  • Michael Wortzman
  • Tania H. Watts
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 691)

Abstract

A session entitled, “Functions of the TNF family in infectious disease,” was held at the 12th International TNF conference at El Escorial, Spain, April 28, 2009. The session highlighted the diverse and complex interplay between pathogens and the immune system and how TNF family members can contribute to both immune protection and immune pathology. Here we summarize some of the key findings and unifying themes that are discussed in more depth in the chapters that follow [1–6].

Keywords

Severe Malaria Immune Pathology Soluble TNFR Normal Homeostatic Condition CrmB Protein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of ImmunologyUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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