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Introduction to Coupled Data Technologies

  • Ron Ho
  • Robert Drost
Chapter
Part of the Integrated Circuits and Systems book series (ICIR, volume 0)

Abstract

The past quarter-century has seen an explosive growth in the performance of computer systems. One of the first widely popular personal computers was a mid-1980s IBM PC, running on a 4.77 MHz Intel 8088 processor, stuffed with 256 KB of system memory (plus another 384 KB on an expansion card), displaying 640x200 black-and-white graphics, and storing data on 360 KB 5.25-inch floppy disks. In 2009, a typical workstation configuration sold by Sun Microsystems, the Ultra 24 Workstation, used a 3 GHz Intel Quad Core 2 processor with 8 GB of memory, displayed 2560x1600 graphics on a 30-inch LCD monitor using an Nvidia Quadro NVS 290 accelerator card, with up to 1.8 TB of Serial-Attached SCSI drives spinning at 15 krpm.

Keywords

Clock Cycle Logic Gate 90nm CMOS Solder Connection IEEE International Electron Device 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Sun Microsystems Research LabsMenlo ParkUSA

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