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Scientific Services on the Cloud

  • David Chapman
  • Karuna P. Joshi
  • Yelena Yesha
  • Milt Halem
  • Yaacov Yesha
  • Phuong Nguyen
Chapter

Abstract

Scientific Computing was one of the first every applications for parallel and distributed computation. To this date, scientific applications remain some of the most compute intensive, and have inspired creation of petaflop compute infrastructure such as the Oak Ridge Jaguar and Los Alamos RoadRunner. Large dedicated hardware infrastructure has become both a blessing and a curse to the scientific community. Scientists are interested in cloud computing for much the same reason as businesses and other professionals. The hardware is provided, maintained, and administrated by a third party. Software abstraction and virtualization provide reliability, and fault tolerance. Graduated fees allow for multi-scale prototyping and execution. Cloud computing resources are only a few clicks away, and by far the easiest high performance distributed platform to gain access to. There may still be dedicated infrastructure for ultra-scale science, but the cloud can easily play a major part of the scientific computing initiative.

Keywords

Cloud Computing Directed Acyclic Graph Service Level Agreement Composite Service Programming Paradigm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Chapman
    • 1
  • Karuna P. Joshi
    • 1
  • Yelena Yesha
    • 1
  • Milt Halem
    • 1
  • Yaacov Yesha
    • 1
  • Phuong Nguyen
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Science and Electrical Engineering DepartmentUniversity of MarylandBaltimore CountyUSA

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