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Sexual Disorders

  • M. Todd Sewell
Chapter

Abstract

Sexual disorders include both sexual dysfunctions and paraphilias. Sexual dysfunctions are sexual disorders characterized by problems that occur during the phases of the sexual response cycle. Paraphilias “are characterized by recurrent, intense sexual urges, fantasies, or behaviors that involve unusual objects, activities, or situations...” (DSM-IV-TR; American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2000, p. 535).

Keywords

Erectile Dysfunction Sexual Dysfunction Watchful Waiting Premature Ejaculation Sexual Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Nevada-RenoRenoUSA

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