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Aggregate Modeling of Manufacturing Systems

  • Erjen Lefeber
  • Dieter Armbruster
Chapter
Part of the International Series in Operations Research & Management Science book series (ISOR, volume 151)

Abstract

In this chapter we will present three approaches to model manufacturing systems in an aggregate way leading to fast and effective (i.e., scalable) simulations that allow the development of simulation tools for rapid exploration of different production scenarios in a factory as well as in a whole supply chain. We will present the main ideas and show some validation studies. Fundamental references are given for more detailed studies.

Keywords

Manufacturing System Discrete Event Simulation Actual Arrival Gantt Chart Clearing Function 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported in parts by NSF grant DMS 0604986. We thank Pascal Etman, Ad Kock, and Christian Ringhofer for many insightful discussions and Bas Coenen, Ton Geubbels, Michael Lamarca, Martijn Peeters, Dominique Perdaen, and William van den Bremer for computational assistance.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringEindhoven University of TechnologyEindhovenThe Netherlands

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