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Flow Sensors

Abstract

One of the fundamentals of physics is that mass is a conserved quantity. It cannot be created or destroyed. In the absence of sources or sinks of mass, its quantity remains constant regardless of boundaries. However, if there is influx or outflow of mass through the boundaries, the sum of influx and efflux must be zero. Whatever mass comes in, must go out.

Keywords

  • Thermal Transport
  • Flow Sensor
  • Radial Compressor
  • Ultrasonic Sensor
  • Smoke Alarm

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4419-6466-3_11
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Notes

  1. 1.

    The Bernoulli’s principle is named after the Dutch-Swiss mathematician Daniel Bernoulli who published his principle in his book Hydrodynamica in 1738.

  2. 2.

    It is assumed that both pressure measurements are made at the same height (y = 0), which is usually the case.

  3. 3.

    In this sensor, the crystalline element, which is poled during the manufacturing process, is the same as used in piezo- or pyroelectric sensors. However, the operating principle of the breeze sensor is neither related to mechanical stress nor heat flow. Nevertheless, for the simplicity of the description, we will use the term piezoelectric.

  4. 4.

    Alfa radiation consists of Helium-4 positively charged nucleus and due to high mass travels with the speed of only about 15,000 km/s. Thus, it easily can be stopped by just a thin tissue paper and, due to collisions with air molecules, travels in air at distances no farther than few centimeters.

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Correspondence to Jacob Fraden .

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Fraden, J. (2010). Flow Sensors. In: Handbook of Modern Sensors. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-6466-3_11

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-6466-3_11

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