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Chemicals of Emerging Concern in the Great Lakes Basin: An Analysis of Environmental Exposures

  • Gary Klečka
  • Carolyn Persoon
  • Rebecca Currie
Part of the Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology book series (RECT, volume 207)

Abstract

Environmental analysis and monitoring have long been recognized as a means for assessing environmental quality. Within the Great Lakes watershed, the governments of the United States and Canada, together with collaborating agencies, have performed numerous surveys of environmental contaminants in the air, water, sediments, and biota. Environmental monitoring programs are necessary to develop comprehensive descriptions of environmental quality, including at spatial and temporal scales, and to provide a sound basis for effective measures, strategies, and policies to address environmental problems (Calamari et al. 2000). While an important use of monitoring data is to inform environmental risk assessment, information gained from environmental measurements is also important for priority setting in regard to addressing the potential hazards of chemical contaminants.

Keywords

Great Lake Flame Retardant Lake Trout PBDE Congener PBDE Concentration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank Sheridan Haack, Derek Muir, and Mike Murray for assistance with identifying relevant studies. The authors also thank John Struger for providing additional details on pesticide monitoring conducted in Canada.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Dow Chemical CompanyMidlandUSA
  2. 2.The University of IowaIowa CityUSA

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