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Who Benefits from Complexity? A View from Futuna

  • Brian Hayden
  • Suzanne Villeneuve
Part of the Fundamental Issues in Archaeology book series (FIAR)

Abstract

Who benefits from complexity? Is it the general populace as systems theorists and functionalists would have it, or is it the elites as Marxists would have it? And if the latter, is it the warriors? the priests? the political big men or chiefs? This issue is critical for understanding the origins of socioeconomic inequality, one of the most important theoretical issues in archaeology being discussed today.

Keywords

Symbolic Capital Political Ecology Northwest Coast Gift Exchange Village Chief 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Archaeology DepartmentSimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada

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