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Multisystemic Therapy for Conduct Problems in Youth

  • Cindy M. Schaeffer
  • Michael R. McCart
  • Scott W. Henggeler
  • Phillippe B. Cunningham
Chapter

Abstract

Multisystemic Therapy (MST; Henggeler, Schoenwald, Borduin, Rowland, & Cunningham, 1998, 2009) is a comprehensive family- and community-based treatment for youth with serious conduct problems who are at imminent risk of out-of-home placement (e.g., detention, incarceration, residential treatment). The effectiveness of MST has been established with chronic and violent juvenile delinquents and substance abusing youth. Adapted versions of the MST model have also been successfully applied to youth with other clinical problems, such as problem sexual behavior, psychiatric disturbance, and pediatric chronic illness. This chapter outlines the theoretical and empirical foundations of MST and provides a brief overview of the MST treatment model. A case example is used to illustrate the clinical aspects of the MST approach. The remainder of the chapter summarizes the growing evidence base for MST established through efficacy, effectiveness, and transportability trials.

Keywords

Conduct Problem Juvenile Offender Probation Officer Behavioral Parent Training Deviant Peer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer New York 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cindy M. Schaeffer
    • 1
  • Michael R. McCart
    • 1
  • Scott W. Henggeler
    • 1
  • Phillippe B. Cunningham
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA

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