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Functional Family Therapy

A Phase-Based and Multi-Component Approach to Change
  • James F. Alexander
  • Michael S. Robbins
Chapter

Abstract

Functional Family Therapy (FFT) is all about helping youth and families who are in trouble. Central to FFT is the belief this can be accomplished by changing family interactions and improving relationship functioning as the primary vehicle for changing dysfunctional individual behaviors. FFT shares many similarities with other systems approaches; however, FFT offers a comprehensive framework for understanding adolescent behavior problems that is quite unique. This framework provides the context for integrating and linking behavioral and cognitive intervention strategies to the specific familial and ecological characteristics of each family. As such, FFT is also about therapists, about training and supervision, and about treatment and other (educational, judicial, religious, cultural, political, economic, marketing) systems that surround families, therapists, and agencies.

Keywords

Family Member Behavior Change Relational Function Negative Behavior Juvenile Justice System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer New York 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • James F. Alexander
    • 1
  • Michael S. Robbins
    • 2
  1. 1.University of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  2. 2.Oregon Research InstitutePembroke PinesUSA

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