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Preventing and Intervening in Crisis Situations

  • Melissa A. Reeves
  • Amanda B. Nickerson
  • Stephen E. Brock
Chapter

Abstract

Over the past 30 years, the role of school psychologists in school-based crisis intervention has increased significantly. In fact, it has reached a point where following a crisis these interventions are expected by the public (Brock, Sandoval, & Lewis, 2001). In addition, they have become a school psychology training standard (National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), 2000).

Keywords

School Psychologist Crisis Intervention Psychological Safety Crisis Intervention Team Crisis Response 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melissa A. Reeves
    • 1
  • Amanda B. Nickerson
  • Stephen E. Brock
  1. 1.Winthrop UniversityRock HillUSA

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