Advertisement

A Statewide Collaboration to Build the Leadership and Organizational Capacity of Consumer-Run Organizations (CROs)

  • Oliwier Dziadkowiec
  • Crystal Reinhart
  • Chi Connie Vu
  • Todd Shagott
  • Ashlee Keele-Lien
  • Adrienne Banta
  • Scott Wituk
  • Greg Meissen

Abstract

Mental health consumer-run organizations (CROs) are a heterogeneous group of recovery-oriented settings founded on peer support and mutual aid. This chapter focuses on consumer-run organizations in Kansas. The discussion begins with the history of the consumer movement on a national level, followed by the history of CROs in Kansas. The next section consists of an in-depth commentary about the collaborative relationship between the Center for Community Support and Research (CCSR) and Kansas CROs and is followed by a brief overview of research studies conducted by CCSR to assess impact and capacity needs of CROs. The chapter concludes with a focus on the future of CROs and the future of the consumer movement in Kansas.

Keywords

Mental Health Service Mental Health System Organizational Capacity Leadership Development Mental Health Consumer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

The authors wish to thank the Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services (SRS), the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) for their support throughout the years for this work.

References

  1. Brown, L. D., Collins, V., Shepherd, M. D., Wituk, S. A. & Meissen, G. (2004). Photovoice and consumer-run mutual support organizations. International Journal of Self Help and Self Care, 2(4), 339–344.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Brown, L. D., Shepherd, M. D., Merkle, E., Wituk, S. A., & Meissen, G. (2008). Understanding how participation in a consumer-run organization relates to recovery. American Journal of Community Psychology, 42(1), 167–178.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Brown, L. D., Shepherd, M. D., Wituk, S. A., & Meissen, G. (2007). Goal achievement and the accountability of consumer-run organizations. The Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research, 31(4), 73–82.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Center for Community Support and Research (2007). 2007 Track and trend report. WSU Center for Community Support and Research, Wichita, KS.Google Scholar
  5. Corrigan, P. W., Slopen, N., Gracia, G., Phelan, S., Keogh, C. B., & Keck, L. (2005). Some recovery processes in mutual-help groups for persons with mental illness; II: Qualitative analysis of participant interviews. Community Mental Health Journal, 41(6), 721–735.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Mowbray, C., & Moxley, D. (1997). Future for empowerment of consumer role innovation. In C. Mowbray, D. Moxley, C. Jasper, & L. Howell (Eds.), Consumers as Providers in Psychiatric Rehabilitation (pp. 518–525). Columbia, MD: International Association of Psychosocial Rehabilitation Services.Google Scholar
  7. Mowbray, C. T., Robinson, E. A., & Holter, M. C. (2002). Consumer drop-in centers: Operations, services, and consumer involvement. Health and Social Work, 27, 248–261.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Mowbray, C. T., & Tan, C. (1993). Consumer-operated drop-in centers: Evaluation of operations and impact. Journal of Mental Health Administration, 20(1), 8–19.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Nelson, G., Ochocka, J., Janzen, R., & Trainor, J. (2006a). A longitudinal study of mental health consumer/survivor initiatives: Part I. Journal of Community Psychology 34(3), 247–260.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Nelson, G., Ochocka, J., Janzen, R., & Trainor, J. (2006b). A longitudinal study of mental health consumer/survivor initiatives: Part 2 – A quantitative study of impacts of participation on new members. Journal of Community Psychology, 34(3), 261–272.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. New Freedom Commission on Mental Health (2003). Achieving the promise: Transforming mental health care in America. Executive summary (Publication No. SMA-03-3831). Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.Google Scholar
  12. Ochocka, J., Nelson, G., Janzen, R., & Trainor, J. (2006). A longitudinal study of mental health consumer/survivor initiatives: Part 3 – Impacts of participation on new members. Journal of Community Psychology, 34(3), 273–283.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Reinhart, C., Meissen, G., Wituk, S., & Shepherd, M. (2008). Setting level characteristics in consumer-run organizations that enhance member outcomes. International Journal of Self-Help and Self-Care, 4(1–2), 137–147.Google Scholar
  14. Shagott, T., Vu, C., Reinhart, C., Wituk, S., & Meissen, G. (2009). Member characteristics of consumer run organizations and service utilization patterns. International Journal of Self-Help and Self-Care, 4(3), 221–238.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Shagott, T., Vu, C., Reinhart, C., Wituk, S., & Meissen, G. (2006). Evaluating the impact of participation in consumer run organizations. WSU Center forCommunity Support and Research, Wichita, KS.Google Scholar
  16. Shepherd, M. D. & Brown, L. (2004a). Technical assistance provided to consumer run organizations in 2003. WSU Center for Community Support and Research, Wichita, KS.Google Scholar
  17. Shepherd, M. D., & Brown, L. (2004b). The organizational health of consumer run organizations in Kansas. WSU Center for Community Support and Research, Wichita, KS.Google Scholar
  18. Shepherd, M. D. (2003). Assistance provided to consumer run organizations by self help network: Center for Community Support and Research. WSU Center for Community Support and Research, Wichita, KS.Google Scholar
  19. Silverman, S. H., Blank, M. B., & Taylor, L. C. (1997). On our own: Preliminary findings from a consumer-run service model. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, 21(2), 151–159.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Solomon, P. (2004) Peer support/ Peer provided services underlying processes, benefits, and critical ingredients. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal. 27(4), 392–401.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Trainor, J., Shepherd, M., Boydell, K. M., Leff, A., & Crawford, E. (1997). Beyond the service paradigm: the impact and implications of consumer/survivor initiatives. Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, 21(2), 132–140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Wang, C. & Burris, M. A. (1997). Photovoice: Concept, methodology, and use for participatory needs assessment. Health Education and Behavior, 24(3), 369–387.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Wang, C. & Redwood-Jones, Y. (2001). Photovoice ethics: Perspectives from Flint Photovoice. Health Education and Behavior, 28(5), 560–572.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Young, J. & Williams, C. L. (1987). An evaluation of GROW, a mutual-help community mental health organization. Community Health Studies, 11(1), 38–42.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Zinman, S. Harp, H. T., & Budd, S. (1987). Reaching across: Mental health clients helping each other. California Network of Mental Health Clients, CA.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Oliwier Dziadkowiec
    • 1
  • Crystal Reinhart
    • 2
  • Chi Connie Vu
    • 3
  • Todd Shagott
    • 1
  • Ashlee Keele-Lien
    • 1
  • Adrienne Banta
    • 1
  • Scott Wituk
    • 1
  • Greg Meissen
    • 4
  1. 1.Center for Community Support and ResearchWichita State UniversityWichitaUSA
  2. 2.Center for Prevention Research & DevelopmentUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignChampaignUSA
  3. 3.James Bell AssociatesWashingtonUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychologyWichita State UniversityWichitaUSA

Personalised recommendations