Advertisement

Working with Narrative and Interpretation

  • Richard A. Young
  • Sheila K. Marshall
  • Ladislav Valach
  • José F. Domene
  • Matthew D. Graham
  • Anat Zaidman-Zait
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter deals with two important counseling processes in working with youth in the transition to adulthood, narrative and interpretation. At first glance these processes may seem quite separate, but, as we shall point out in this chapter, they are closely linked not only in counseling but also in the lives of clients more broadly. Writing about action we also repeatedly refer in this book to narratives and mention interpretation. These obviously are expressions we use beyond everyday usage and connect a particular theoretical conceptualization with these terms and a practical procedure when working with empirical material (Young & Collin, 1992).

Keywords

Joint Action Action Theory Joint Project Counseling Intervention Initial Session 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Hardtke, K. K., & Angus, L. E. (2004). The narrative assessment interview. Assessing self-change in psychotherapy. In L. E. Angus & J. McLeod (Eds.), The handbook of narrative and psychotherapy: Practice, theory, and research (pp. 247–262). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Pasupathi, M., & Hoyt, T. (2009). The development of narrative identity in late adolescence and emergent adulthood: The continued importance of listeners. Developmental Psychology, 45, 558–574.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Young, R. A., Valach, L., & Collin, A. (2002). A contextual explanation of career. In D. Brown & Associates (Eds.), Career choice and development (4th ed., pp. 206–250). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  4. Cochran, L. R. (1997). Career counseling: A narrative approach. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  5. Ricoeur, P. (1984). Time and narrative I. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  6. Young, R. A., & Collin, A. (Eds.). (1992). Interpreting career: Hermeneutical studies of lives in context. Westport, CT: Praeger.Google Scholar
  7. McLean, K. C. (2008). Stories of the young and the old: Personal continuity and narrative identity. Developmental Psychology, 44, 254–264.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Savickas, M. L., Nota, L., Rossier, J., Dauwalder, J.-P., Duarte, M. E., Guichard, J., et al. (2009). Life-designing: A paradigm for career construction in the 21st century. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 75, 239–250.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Habermas, J. (1971). Knowledge and human interests. Boston: Beacon Press.Google Scholar
  10. Bordin, E. S. (1994). Theory and research on the therapeutic working alliance: New directions. In A. O. Horvath & L. S. Greenberg (Eds.), The working alliance: Theory, research, and practice (pp. 13–37). Oxford, UK: John Wiley.Google Scholar
  11. Habermas, T., & Bluck, S. (2000). Getting a life: The emergence of the life story in adolescence. Psychological Bulletin, 126, 248–269.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Ricoeur, P. (1987). Time and narrative III. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  13. Heidegger, M. (1962). Being and time (J. Macquarrie & E. Robinson, Trans.). New York: Harper & Row. (Original work published 1927).Google Scholar
  14. Bentz, V. M. (1989). Becoming mature: Childhood ghosts and spirits in adult life. New York: Aldine de Gruyter.Google Scholar
  15. Collin, A., & Young, R. A. (1992). Constructing career through narrative and context: An interpretive perspective. In R. A. Young & A. Collin (Eds.), Interpreting career: Hermeneutical studies of lives in context (pp. 1–14). Westport, CT: Praeger.Google Scholar
  16. Taylor, C. (1989). Sources of the self. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  17. Bruner, J. (1994). The remembered self. In U. Neisser & R. Fivush (Eds.), The remembering self: Construction and accuracy in the self-narrative (pp. 41–54). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Savickas, M. L. (2005). The theory and practice of career construction. In S. D. Brown & R. W. Lent (Eds.), Career development and counseling: Putting theory and research to work (pp. 42–70). Hoboken. NJ: Wiley.Google Scholar
  19. Young, R. A., & Valach, L. (2000). Reconceptualising career theory and research: An action-theoretical perspective. In A. Collin & R. A. Young (Eds.), The future of career (pp. 181–196). Cambridge , UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Guichard, J. (2005). Life-long self construction. International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance, 5, 111–124.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Angus, L. E., & McLeod, J. (Eds.). (2004). The handbook of narrative and psychotherapy: Practice, theory, and research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  22. McIlveen, P., & Patton, W. (2007a). Narrative career counselling: Theory and exemplars of practice. Australian Psychologist, 42, 295–311.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Reissman, C. K., & Quinney, L. (2005). Narrative in social work: A critical review. Qualitative Social Work, 4, 391–412.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Bruner, J. (1990). Acts of meaning. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  25. McAdams, D. P. (1993). The stories we live by: Personal myths and the making of the self. New York: Morrow.Google Scholar
  26. Ricoeur, P., & Kearney, R. (Eds.). (1996). Paul Ricoeur: The hermeneutics of action. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  27. McAdams, D. P. (1996). Personality, modernity, and the stories self: A modest proposal. In R. Ashmore & L. Jussim (Eds.), Self and identity: Fundamental issues (pp. 46–78). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  28. Freud, S. (1978). The interpretation of dreams (A. A. Brill, Trans.). New York: Modern Library. (Original work published 1900).Google Scholar
  29. Guichard, J. (2009). Self-constructing. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 75, 251–258.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Bruner, J. (2004). The narrative creation of self. In L. E. Angus & J. McLeod (Eds.), The handbook of narrative and psychotherapy: Practice, theory, and research (pp. 3–14). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  31. Ricoeur, P. (1985). Time and narrative II. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  32. Egan, G. (2001). The skilled helper (8th ed.). Monterey, CA: Brooks/Cole.Google Scholar
  33. White, M. (2004). Folk psychology and narrative practice. In L. E. Angus & J. McLeod (Eds.), The handbook of narrative and psychotherapy: Practice, theory, and research (pp. 15–51). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  34. Dyer, B., Pizzarno, M. C., Qi, K., Valach, L., Marshall, S. K., & Young, R. A. (2010). Unconscious processes in career counselling: An action-theoretical perspective. British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 38, 343–362.Google Scholar
  35. Dilthey, W. (1976). The development of hermeneutics. In H. Rickman (Ed. & Trans.), Dilthey: Selected writings (pp. 246–263). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. (Original work published 1900).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media,LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard A. Young
    • 1
  • Sheila K. Marshall
    • 2
  • Ladislav Valach
    • 3
  • José F. Domene
    • 4
  • Matthew D. Graham
    • 5
  • Anat Zaidman-Zait
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of Educational, Counselling Psychology and Special EducationUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  2. 2.School of Social Work, University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  3. 3.BremgartenSwitzerland
  4. 4.University of New BrunswickFrederictonCanada
  5. 5.Orion HealthSurreyCanada
  6. 6.University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

Personalised recommendations