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Reconceptualizing Defense, Unconscious Processes, and Self-Knowledge: David Shapiro’s Contribution

  • Morris N. Eagle
Chapter

Abstract

David Shapiro is an original, lucid, and independent thinker. Although obviously strongly influenced by psychoanalytic theory and practice, Shapiro does not easily fit into this or that psychoanalytic “school.” If one had to place him somewhere in the world of psychoanalytic theory, one would locate him in the broad category of ego psychology, a placement partly dictated by the obvious influence on his work of Reich’s character analysis and the writings and thoughts of his teacher, Helmuth Kaiser. However, as we will see, Shapiro’s thinking defies any straightforward assignment to a particular “school.”

Keywords

Conscious Experience Psychoanalytic Theory Physiological Cost External Trauma Maladaptive Consequence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Derner Institute of Advanced Psychological StudiesAdelphi UniversityGarden CityUSA
  2. 2.California Lutheran UniversityThousand OaksUSA

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