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Two Configurations of Personality Development and Psychopathology: Etiologic and Therapeutic Implications

  • Sidney J. Blatt
Chapter

Abstract

David Shapiro, in an unpublished paper titled: On two fundamental categories of psychopathology,notes that he and I via “different routes,” have “arrived at the same conclusion that there are two fundamental categories of psychopathology.” Shapiro notes “a general congruence” of his concepts of a “rigid mode” and a “passive-reactive mode” (e.g., Shapiro, 1981, 2000) and my formulations of anaclitic and introjective configurations of personality development, personality organization and psychopathology (e.g., Blatt, 1974, 1990, 1991, 2006, 2008; Blatt and Shichman, 1983). But Shapiro also notes that “on a certain important point concerning both etiology and dynamics… [we] clearly diverge” and he discusses our divergence about “the dynamics of psychopathology and perhaps also its etiology.” This paper articulates more fully this divergence and why I, in contrast to Shapiro, think it important to include aspects of the etiology and dynamics in formulations of the two configurations of psychopathology. I briefly cite studies that demonstrate the validity of some the assumptions about the etiology and dynamics of the anaclitic and introjective configurations of personality organization and psychopathology and how these assumptions facilitate the articulation of a theoretically coherent and comprehensive model of psychological development, personality organization and psychopathology that has etiologic as well as therapeutic implications.

Keywords

Personality Disorder Attachment Style Personality Development Psychological Development Interpersonal Relatedness 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Yale School of MedicineNew HavenUSA

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