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Psychoeducational Assessment

  • David N. Miller
  • Stephen E. Brock
Chapter
Part of the Developmental Psychopathology at School book series (DPS)

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to discuss the psychoeducational assessment of NSSI. Because psychoeducational assessment typically occurs within school settings, this will involve considerations as to whether the nature and degree of self-injury warrants possible special education services. Consequently, this chapter begins with a discussion of psychoeducational diagnostic and classification issues as they may relate to NSSI. A particular focus of this discussion is on the handicapping condition known as Emotional Disturbance, as this category may have particular relevance for at least some students who engage in NSSI. After reviewing this issue, the primary focus of the chapter is on a problem-solving approach to assessment, in which information gained from the assessment of NSSI is linked to the development of appropriate interventions. Finally, a brief discussion of the Internet and its relationship to self-injury among students will be provided.

Keywords

Emotional Disturbance School Personnel Special Education Service School Refusal Individualize Education Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University at Albany State University of New YorkAlbanyUSA
  2. 2.Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation, School Psychology and Deaf StudiesCalifornia State UniversitySacramentoUSA

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