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Introduction

  • David N. Miller
  • Stephen E. Brock
Chapter
Part of the Developmental Psychopathology at School book series (DPS)

Abstract

Self-injury refers to the intentional, purposeful, and socially unacceptable infliction of bodily harm without suicidal intent (Klonsky, 2007; Nixon & Heath, 2009a; Walsh, 2006). Also known as non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI; Nock, 2009), it is a puzzling, disturbing, and often poorly understood behavior prevalent in all cultures and across all socioeconomic levels (Lieberman & Poland, 2006). Although the first recorded account of NSSI occurred over 2,400 years ago (Favazza, 1998), it has only been in recent decades that this condition has received widespread attention from professionals and the general public. The most common form of NSSI appears to be skin cutting (Klonsky & Muehlenkamp, 2007), and most individuals who engage in it typically cut on their forearms, although it is not necessarily restricted to that area (Nixon & Heath, 2009a). NSSI may take other forms as well, including severe skin scratching, picking at wounds, inserting objects into the body, or banging one’s head (D’Onofrio, 2007). This last behavior, however, is more typically observed among students with severe developmental disabilities (Brock, Jimerson, & Hansen, 2006) and is different from the type of NSSI examined in this book.

Keywords

Suicidal Behavior School Personnel Borderline Personality Disorder School Professional Special Education Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University at Albany State University of New YorkAlbanyUSA
  2. 2.Department of Special Education, Rehabilitation, School Psychology and Deaf StudiesCalifornia State UniversitySacramentoUSA

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