Fertility Issues for Newly Diagnosed Women Interested in Child Bearing: Strategies and Options



Breast cancer is the most common cancer among reproductive aged women, accounting for 30% of all cancers. In the United States during 2005, more than 210,000 new cases of breast cancer were reported and approximately 11,000 occurred in women younger than 40 years. Among the many concerns experienced by patients with breast cancer, fertility issues can be a particular concern. Identifying this need and offering specialized counseling at the earliest possible point in the patient’s care can potentially preserve options for future pregnancy in the young woman with breast cancer.


Breast Cancer Ovarian Tissue Ovarian Stimulation Fertility Preservation Premature Menopause 


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Copyright information

© Springer New York 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA

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