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FAP-Enhanced Couple Therapy: Perspectives and Possibilities

  • Alan S. Gurman
  • Thomas J. Waltz
  • William C. Follette
Chapter

Abstract

A Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (Kohlenberg & Tsai, 1991) approach to couple therapy or a FAP-enhanced approach to other variants of behavioral couple therapies (Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy, Cognitive Behavioral Couple Therapy, Traditional Behavioral Couple Therapy) may seem to have been inevitable in the context of the rapidly evolving “third wave” of behavior therapy (Functional Analytic Psychotherapy, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Dialectical Behavior Therapy.

Keywords

Partner Interaction Dialectical Behavior Therapy Partner Relationship Case Conceptualization Couple Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan S. Gurman
    • 1
  • Thomas J. Waltz
    • 2
  • William C. Follette
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public HealthMadisonUSA
  2. 2.University of NevadaRenoUSA

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