FAP with People Convicted of Sexual Offenses

Chapter

Abstract

The history of sex offense treatment parallels the history of treatment within the broader field of psychology. When psychoanalytic theories and approaches were popular, clinicians offered psychoanalytic approaches to address sexual offense behavior. When institutionalization was the norm for treating significant behavioral problems, hospital-based “sexual psychopath” treatment programs were employed to treat sexual offense behavior. When behavioral approaches increased in popularity, clinicians increasingly employed behavioral approaches to target sexually problematic behavior (Kohlenberg,

Keywords

Explosive Expense Posit Sonar Fetishism 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Forensic Behavioral HealthPapillionUSA
  2. 2.Nebraska Wesleyan UniversityLincolnUSA
  3. 3.Independent PracticeSeattleUSA

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