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Ethical, Legal and Social Issues in the Genetic Testing of Minors

  • Bernice S. Elger
Chapter
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

Since the availability of testing for hereditary diseases, genetic testing of minors has stirred controversy as regards the ethical implications of the tests. The fear that genetic testing of children could have adverse social, emotional. psychosocial and educational consequences in childhood or later life has motivated a cautious approach. In summary, guidelines agree that genetic testing of children is appropriate in two situations. The first is the testing of a symptomatic child if the tests are likely to help establish a diagnosis and/or a prognosis and to avoid further invasive diagnostic tests. The second is predictive genetic testing in healthy children where onset of the condition regularly occurs in childhood and useful medical interventions can be offered.

Keywords

Genetic Testing Newborn Screening Carrier Status Medical Benefit Carrier Screening 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernice S. Elger
    • 1
  1. 1.University of GenevaGenevaSwitzerland

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