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Rheumatic Disease in the Nursing Home Patient

  • Joanne Sandberg-CookEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Currently 20,000 nursing homes provide care for nearly two million persons in USA. Today, 69% of people turning 65 years will need some form of long-term care. By 2020, 12 million Americans will need long-term health care for short-term rehabilitation, short-term hospice care, or longer term custodial care. These are typically the ­oldest and sickest geriatric patients and the most vulnerable to geriatric syndromes including polypharmacy, falls, cognitive impairment, and frailty (failure to thrive). Pain and functional impairment related to rheumatic disease are quite common in this population. Assessment of these patients is complicated by cognitive impairment and comorbidities. Pharmacologic management can be challenging, making non-pharmacologic approaches imperative. Interdisciplinary collaboration adds to the therapeutic options and improves function and comfort.

Keywords

Activities of daily living Functional impairment Polypharmacy Frailty Comorbidity 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dartmouth Hitchcock KendalDartmouth Hitchcock Medical CenterLebanonUSA

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