Bases of an Integrated Model of School Consultation

Chapter
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

In this chapter, we present the underlying bases of the integrated model of school consultation, which is described in detail in Chap. 6. Bases associated with community mental health are the concepts of population-oriented prevention, crisis, and social support as well as Gerald Caplan’s model of mental health consultation (Caplan, 1970; Caplan & Caplan, 1993/1999). Bases associated with behavioral psychology are problem solving, behavior modification in applied settings, and John R. Bergan’s model of behavioral consultation (Bergan, 1977; Bergan & Kratochwill, 1990). Another important foundation is social influence, particularly as revealed through social power bases. Finally, we address the issue of laying the groundwork for successful entry into school and classroom settings. After reading this chapter, one should understand the bases of and rationale for the integrated model of school consultation presented in Chap. 6.

Keywords

Assure Arena Kelly Metaphor 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologySyracuse UniversitySyracuseUSA

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