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Mechanism-Based Modeling of Thermal- and Moisture-Induced Failure of IC Devices

Chapter
Part of the Micro- and Opto-Electronic Materials, Structures, and Systems book series (MOEM)

Abstract

IC packages are multi-layered structures with a large number of interfaces joining oxides, metals, and polymers. For these structures, interface separation is often the result of nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids. The larger number of micro-pores and cavities observed within the adhesive film, as well as along the film–substrate interfaces, therefore poses a serious threat to the structural integrity of the IC packages. A common occurrence of interfacial failure is during the surface mounting of electronic packages onto the printed circuit board under reflow temperatures of 220–260°C. These temperatures exceed the glass transition temperatures, T g, of the polymeric adhesives and molding compounds and can induce high thermal misfit stresses at the die/adhesive and die/molding compound interfaces. Prior to reflow soldering, moisture diffuses through the hygroscopic polymeric materials and condenses within the micro-pores.

Keywords

Vapor pressure Residual stress Void growth Pressure-sensitivity Micromechanics-based model Gurson model Cell element approach IC package Nonlinear viscosity Polymeric materials 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringNational University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore

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