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Third Sector–Government Partnerships

  • Annette Zimmer
Chapter

Abstract

Against the background of the current shift from government to governance, relationships between third sector and government are increasingly attracting the attention of social scientific researchers. The chapter highlights selected approaches that characterize and explain third sector–government relationships. The embeddedness of third sector organizations (TSOs) turns out to be the decisive factor for the development and further advancement of partnerships between the sector and government. The chapter also sheds light on the “blurring of boundaries,” since engaged in both advocacy and policy implementation, TSOs are increasingly developing into hybrids that Amitai Etzioni characterized as organizations for the future.

Keywords

Welfare State Sector Organization Governance Arrangement Policy Field Partnership Arrangement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Westfälische Wilhelms-UniversitätMünsterGermany

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