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Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA or NAA)

  • Mary E. Malainey
Chapter
Part of the Manuals in Archaeological Method, Theory and Technique book series (MATT)

Abstract

Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) or simply neutron activation analysis (NAA) is used to detect and quantify elements in inorganic substances. The technique is extensively employed for provenance studies of archaeological lithics, ceramic, and glass (Speakman and Glascock 2007). By targeting emissions from specific isotopes, simultaneous analysis of major, minor, and trace elements is possible. The detection limits for most elements are in the order of parts per million; sample sizes range from about 30 mg to a few grams. Usually samples are powdered prior to analysis but small archaeological samples have been analyzed whole.

Keywords

Neutron Activation Analysis Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis Neutron Capture Beta Particle Provenance Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary E. Malainey
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyBrandon UniversityBrandonCanada

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