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Human Ecology pp 317-329 | Cite as

Gender, Social Difference and Coastal Resource Management in Lowland Philippine Fishing Communities

  • James F. Eder
Chapter

Abstract

This paper considers how an effort to institutionalize coastal resource management (CRM) at the municipal level in the Philippines has unfolded against the class, ethnic, and gender divisions characteristic of lowland Philippine society. It draws inspiration from recent suggestions that the study of community-based natural resource management would be better served by focusing on institutions rather than on community per se (King and Durrenberger 2000; Agrawal and Gibson 2001) and, more particularly, on how institutions shape (and are shaped by) the multiple interests and actors within communities (Agrawal and Gibson 1999, p. 640). Of special interest here is how institutional arrangements may influence both the reality and the perception of local community “participation,” which is much sought-after in resource management projects in general.

Keywords

Coral Reef Municipal Government Municipal Water Coastal Resource Social Division 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Arizona State UniversityTempeUSA

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