Treatment of Severe Relational Incompetence: One Approach Is Not Enough

  • Luciano L’Abate
  • Mario Cusinato
  • Eleonora Maino
  • Walter Colesso
  • Claudia Scilletta
Chapter

Abstract

Through face-to-face interviews and direct observation of individuals, couples, and families, especially in clinical, critical, or criminal relationships, it is possible to discern relatively easily whether their styles are abusive–apathetic or reactive–repetitive (RR). It is doubtful whether conductive–creative (CC) styles, as in the ARC model (Model9), are present in clinical relationships, unless they are used to present a false, positive façade. However, usually this façade crumbles after a few interviews. Once they are observed, these styles can be prescribed paradoxically, to see whether they can be changed (Weeks & L’Abate, 1982). Many other tasks, such as time-out and sibling rivalry, were derived from clinical practice, where repetition of the same instructions was found to be more useful if they were administered in writing.

Keywords

Depression Beach Stein Defend 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luciano L’Abate
    • 1
  • Mario Cusinato
    • 2
  • Eleonora Maino
    • 3
  • Walter Colesso
    • 2
  • Claudia Scilletta
    • 4
  1. 1.Georgia State UniversityAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.University of PaduaPaduaItaly
  3. 3.Scientific Institute Eugenio MedeaBosisio PariniItaly
  4. 4.MilanoItaly

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