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Technology-Rich Tools to Support Self-Regulated Learning and Performance in Medicine

  • Susanne P. Lajoie
  • Laura Naismith
  • Eric Poitras
  • Yuan-Jin Hong
  • Ilian Cruz-Panesso
  • John Ranellucci
  • Samuel Mamane
  • Jeffrey Wiseman
Chapter
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 28)

Abstract

Medical students’ metacognitive and self-regulatory behaviors are examined as they diagnose patient cases using BioWorld, a technology rich learning environment. BioWorld offers an authentic problem-based environment where students solve clinical cases and receive expert feedback. We evaluate the effectiveness of key features in BioWorld (the evidence table and visualization maps) to see whether they promote metacognitive monitoring and evaluation. Learning outcomes were assessed through novice/expert comparisons in relation to diagnostic accuracy, confidence, and case summaries. More specifically we examined how diagnostic processes and learning outcomes were refined or improved through practice at solving a series of patient cases. The results suggest that, with practice, medical students became more expert-like in the processes involved in making crucial clinical decisions. The implications of these findings for the design of features embedded within BioWorld that foster key metacognitive and self-regulatory processes are discussed.

Keywords

Medical Student Metacognitive Skill Diagnostic Reasoning Idea Unit Expert Physician 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susanne P. Lajoie
    • 1
  • Laura Naismith
    • 1
  • Eric Poitras
    • 1
  • Yuan-Jin Hong
    • 1
  • Ilian Cruz-Panesso
    • 1
  • John Ranellucci
    • 1
  • Samuel Mamane
    • 2
  • Jeffrey Wiseman
    • 2
  1. 1.Advanced Technologies for Learning in Authentic Settings (ATLAS), Department of Educational and Counselling PsychologyMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada
  2. 2.Advanced Technologies for Learning in Authentic Settings (ATLAS), Faculty of MedicineMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada

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