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Natural History of Hepatitis B Virus in HIV-Infected Patients

  • Chloe L. Thio
Chapter

Abstract

Both human immunodeficiency virus–1 (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) are transmitted via mucosal and percutaneous routes, so approximately 10% of HIV–infected persons worldwide are coinfected with HBV. In the USA, the HIV Outpatient Study found that between 1996 and 2007, the prevalence of HBV was stable ranging from 7.8 to 8.6% with the greatest fraction being in men who have sex with men [1]. Thus, chronic HBV is a continuing important coinfection in the HIV–infected population.

Both human immunodeficiency virus–1 (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) are transmitted via mucosal and percutaneous routes, so approximately 10% of HIV–infected persons worldwide are coinfected with HBV. In the USA, the HIV Outpatient Study found that between 1996 and 2007, the prevalence of HBV was stable ranging from 7.8 to 8.6% with the greatest fraction being in men who have sex with men [1]. Thus, chronic HBV is a continuing important coinfection in the HIV–infected population.

Keywords

Seroreversion Rate Human Immunodeficiency Virus Outpatient Study Accelerate Liver Disease Progression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of MedicineJohns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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