Ultrasound-Guided Celiac Plexus Block and Neurolysis



Celiac plexus block has been used in various upper abdominal malignant and nonmalignant pain syndromes with variable success. Pain signals stemming from visceral structures that are innervated by the celiac plexus can be interrupted by blocking the celiac plexus or the splanchnic nerves. These structures include the pancreas, liver, gallbladder, mesentery, omentum, and gastrointestinal tract from the lower esophagus to the transverse colon.


Superior Mesenteric Artery Celiac Trunk Splanchnic Nerve Xiphoid Process Celiac Plexus 
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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of RadiologyInnsbruck Medical University, TILAKInnsbruckAustria

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