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Support Groups for Chronic Pain

  • Penney Cowan
Chapter

Abstract

Support groups for people with pain are one area that few, if any, health care professionals think about when treating a person with pain. Yet, the goal of pain management is to help the person move from patient back to a functional person. Even with the best medical care and pain management programs, the job does not stop there. Living with pain is a lifelong commitment that will require the person with pain to remain an active part of their care. It is difficult to go it alone, especially if you do not get the support you need within your personal community. Having a place to go to receive positive reinforcement from peers will allow for continued personal growth and understanding in managing pain. This chapter will focus the importance of peer lead groups in helping the person with pain maintain their wellness through peer lead support groups. We will also explore how such groups should be designed to ensure positive reinforcement of the necessary coping skills. Peer lead groups for people with pain need to be focused on the needs of the person attending the group. It is in establishing a peer lead group that shares responsibility of the logistics, governance, group goals and programming that determines the final success.

Just as important is informing the community about the availability of the group to health care providers, people with pain and their families. The process can be made easier if the person has a “roadmap” to follow.

Keywords

Health Care Provider Support Group Coping Skill Group Meeting Meeting Room 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Penney Cowan
    • 1
  1. 1.American Chronic Pain AssociationRocklinUSA

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