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Participant Adherence

  • Lawrence M. Friedman
  • Curt D. Furberg
  • David L. DeMets
Chapter

Abstract

The terms compliance and adherence are often used interchangeably. Compliance is defined as “the extent to which a person’s behavior (in terms of taking medications, following diets, or executing lifestyle changes) coincides with medical or health advice” [1]. The term adherence is defined similarly, but implies active participant involvement. This book uses the term adherence. For example, an adherer is a participant who meets the standards of adherence as established by the investigator. In a drug trial, he may be a participant who takes at least a predetermined amount such as 80% of the protocol dose. There should also be a maximum dose that defines adherence. This dose will depend on the nature of the drug being evaluated (no more than 100% for some, perhaps a bit higher for others). A review of 192 clinical trial publications from high-impact journals reveals important variability in the definition (and reporting) of medication adherence [2].

Keywords

Medication Adherence Study Medication Pill Count Optimal Medical Therapy Schedule Visit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer New York 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lawrence M. Friedman
    • 1
  • Curt D. Furberg
    • 2
  • David L. DeMets
    • 3
  1. 1.BethesdaUSA
  2. 2.School of MedicineWake Forest UniversityWinston-SalemUSA
  3. 3.Department of Biostatistics & Medical InformaticsUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA

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