The Natural History of Sumatran Orangutan (Pongo abelii)

  • Sri Suci Utami Atmoko
  • Carel P.  van  Schaik
Chapter
Part of the Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects book series (DIPR)

Abstract

The orangutan is the only great ape of Asia. Its present range is confined to dwindling areas on the islands of Sumatra and Borneo (Rijksen and Meijaard 1999). In contrast to its African relatives, the chimpanzee, bonobo (genus Pan), and gorilla (genus Gorilla), it is extremely arboreal (the Sumatra species more so than the Borneo as Sumatra still harbors tigers). In fact, it is the largest and heaviest of all predominantly arboreal mammals. Among the diurnal primates, it is, moreover, exceptional in that it is comparatively solitary.

Keywords

Ketone Subduction Bark Pleistocene Flange 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank the Directorate General of Forest Conservation of the Ministry of Forestry for permission to work in the Gunung Leuser National Park; the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) for permission to work in Indonesia; Utrecht University, Universitas Nasional, Paneco, and WOTRO for long term support of Ketambe Research Center; the Leuser Development Programme for logistic support; and Wildlife Conservation Society and Paneco for generous long-term support of the field site in Suaq Balimbing. We especially thank all the students (UNAS, UNSYIAH, STIK, UI, Utrecht University, Duke University), field assistants, and other researchers who have collected data at Ketambe and Suaq Balimbing. We would also like to thank Anne Russon for the comment and Dr. Jatna Supriatna for inviting us to be a part of the “Indonesian Primate” book.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sri Suci Utami Atmoko
    • 1
  • Carel P.  van  Schaik
  1. 1.Faculty of BiologyUniversitas NasionalJakartaIndonesia

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