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Epidemiology of Mental Disorders in Girls and Female Adolescents

  • Lynn A. Warner
  • Cynthia Bott
Chapter

Abstract

Childhood and adolescence are critical periods for the early identification of psychiatric symptoms and prevention of many mental disorders, including disruptive behavior, mood, and anxiety disorders. Substantial evidence is accumulating from longitudinal birth cohort studies and nationally representative surveys to suggest that there are developmental trajectories of psychiatric problems, many of which onset at young ages. Consequently, effective interventions during early life stages have the potential to support the positive neurobiological, cognitive, and psychosocial development that is needed for successful transitions from youth to adulthood. Epidemiologic studies can help inform priorities for service delivery by identifying the extent to which symptoms remit or develop into disorders during childhood and adolescence, the disorders that may be limited to this age range versus those that persist into adulthood, and the disorders that onset in adulthood for which symptoms may have manifested earlier.

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Conduct Disorder Eating Disorder Disruptive Behavior ADHD Symptom 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lynn A. Warner
    • 1
  • Cynthia Bott
  1. 1.School of Social WelfareUniversity at Albany, SUNYAlbanyUSA

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