Strategic Options for Private Sector Development

Part of the Innovation, Technology, and Knowledge Management book series (ITKM)


Business experience and literature suggest that mastering the use of ICT has become a core competency for pursuing competitive advantage and sustained growth in most industries and services (Chaps. 4 and 6). It is also likely to become a core competency in national development and in delivering public services, education and training, and even microcredit and poverty reduction programs. To realize this potential, the current focus on investment in physical infrastructure and hardware, and on isolated experimentation and piecemeal implementation must be broadened and scaled-up to address the policies, institutions, infrastructures and skills necessary for e-enabled business transformation and grassroots innovation.


Mobile Phone Foreign Direct Investment Core Competency Information Society Mobile Telephony 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.


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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of MarylandBethesdaUSA

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