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Sailors’ Snug Harbor: A Landscape of Gender and Power

  • Sherene Baugher
Chapter

Abstract

Sailors’ Snug Harbor was a nineteenth century private charitable institution on the northern shore of Staten Island in what is now one of the boroughs of New York City (Fig. 8.1). It was the first home built specifically for retired seamen in the United States (Hardin 1983). This chapter focuses on the complex power dynamics reflected in this institution’s gendered landscape. Gendered landscapes can be found in diverse archaeological locations including residential sites, work places, military sites, religious sites, and institutional settings such as reformatories, prisons, and almshouses. Sailors’ Snug Harbor evolved within the context of almshouses in the colonial and early national periods, but unlike most almshouses that served both men and women, Sailors’ Snug Harbor was established exclusively for males. But because Sailors’ Snug Harbor employed women as well as men, its history reflects a gendered landscape within which issues of power and class were played out.

Keywords

Master Plan Female Employee Landscape Design Sewer Line Female Staff 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

I appreciate all the help from the archivists at the Noble Maritime Museum, the State University of New York (SUNY) Maritime College, and the Staten Island Historical Society. I thank Brant Venables for all of his time in transforming color slides into good quality black and white digital images and Hans Klein-Hewett for drafting the fine map of Sailors’ Snug Harbor within New York City. I especially thank my husband, historian Robert W. Venables, for reading drafts of this chapter and providing excellent comments.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Landscape ArchitectureCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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