Advertisement

African-American Women, Power, and Freedom in the Contested Landscape of Camp Nelson, Kentucky

  • W. Stephen McBride
Chapter

Abstract

The above quote (Hanaford 1864a) hints at a conflict that began at the U.S. Army Post of Camp Nelson, Kentucky, in the spring of 1864. This conflict, which I like to call the “Second Battle of Camp Nelson,” pitted escaped slave women and children against the U.S. Army in a fight for self-determination and control of at least a portion of Camp Nelson’s landscape where they could make a home for themselves. More particularly, the battle was over who had ultimate authority over this landscape and how and why these women challenged this authority to ultimately win their own freedom.

Keywords

Slave Owner Refugee Woman Clothing Item Slave State Emancipation Proclamation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Berlin, Ira, Joseph P. Reidy and Leslie S. Rowland 1982 Freedom: A Documentary History of Emancipation, 1861–1867. Series II, the Black Military Experience. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.Google Scholar
  2. Burnside, Pvt. John 1864 Testimony to Capt. E.B.W. Restieaux, December 15, 1864. National Archives, Military Records, RG 92, Entry 225, Box 720. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  3. Davidson, James M. 2004 Rituals Captured in Context and Time: Charm Use in North Dallas Freedman’s Town (1869–1907), Dallas, TX. Historical Archaeology 38(2):22–54.Google Scholar
  4. De Cunzo, Lu Ann 2004 A Historical Archaeology of Delaware: People, Contexts, and the Culture of Agriculture. University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville.Google Scholar
  5. Dickson, Capt. J. Bates 1864 Letter to Capt. T.E. Hall, June 20, 1864. National Archives, Military Records, RG 393, Entry 2168, Telegrams Sent, Vol. 62/117:74. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  6. Dyer, Frederick H.A. 1908 A Compendium of the War of Rebellion: Compiled and Arranged from Official Records. 2 vols. Dyer Publishing Company, Des Moines, Iowa.Google Scholar
  7. Fee, Rev. John Gregg 1864 Letter to Brother Strieby, September 22, 1864. American Missionary Association Archives No. 44038. Berea College, Berea, Kentucky.Google Scholar
  8. 1891 Autobiography of John G. Fee, Berea, Kentucky. National Christian Association, New York, New York.Google Scholar
  9. Ferguson, Leland 1992 Uncommon Ground: Archaeology and Early African American, 1650–1800. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  10. Fry, Brig. Gen. Speed S. 1864a Orders, August 24, 1864. National Archives, Military Records, RG 393, General Orders. Vol. 111/256:79. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  11. 1864b General Orders No. 4, July 12, 1864. National Archives, Military Records RG 393, General Orders. Vol. 111/256:54. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  12. Gladstone, William 1990 United States Colored Troops: 1863–1867. Thomas Publications, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.Google Scholar
  13. Hanaford, Lt. George A. 1864a Letter to Lt. John McQueen, June 17, 1864, National Archives, Military Records, RG 393, Press Copies, Vol. 107:234. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  14. 1864b Order from Brig. Genl. S.S. Fry, July 3, 1864, National Archives, Military Records, RG 393, Press Copies, Vol. 107:354. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  15. 1864c Letter to Capt. J. Bates Dickson, July 6, 1864. National Archives, Military Records, RG 393, Press Copies, Vol. 107:370. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  16. 1864d Letter to Capt. J.H. Johnson, June 17, 1864. National Archives, Military Records, RG 393, Press Copies, Vol. 107:235. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  17. Higgins, Pvt. John 1864 Testimony to Capt. E.B.W. Restieaux, November 28, 1864. National Archives, Military Records, RG 92, Entry 225, Box 720. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  18. Hunter, Tera W. 1997 To ‘Joy My Freedom’: Southern Black Women’s Lives and Labors after the Civil War. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts.Google Scholar
  19. Jordan, Elizabeth G. 2006 It all comes out in the Wash: Expanding Archaeological Interpretations of the Female Slave Experience. Paper presented at the 2006 Society for Historical Archaeology Conference.Google Scholar
  20. 2005 ‘Unrelenting Toil’: Expanding Archaeological Interpretations of the Female Slave Experience. Slavery and Abolition 26(2):217–232.Google Scholar
  21. Lucas, Marion B. 1992 A History of Blacks in Kentucky, Volume I: From Slavery to Segregation, 1760–1891. The Kentucky Historical Society, Frankfort.Google Scholar
  22. McBride, W. Stephen and Kim A. McBride 2006 Civil War Housing: Insights from Camp Nelson, Kentucky. In Huts and History: The Historical Archaeology of Military Encampments during the Civil War. Edited by C. R. Geier, D. G. Orr, and M. B. Reeves, pp. 136–171. University Press of Florida, Gainesville.Google Scholar
  23. McBride, W. Stephen, Susan C. Andrews, J. Howard Beverly, and Tracey A. Sandefur 2003 From Supply Depot to Emancipation Center: The Archaeology of Camp Nelson. Report submitted to the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, Frankfort. Wilbur Smith Associates, Lexington, Kentucky.Google Scholar
  24. Miller, A.B. 1866 Map of Camp Nelson Showing the Location of Buildings. Cartographic Section, National Archives, Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  25. Mullins, Paul R. 1999 Race and Affluence: An Archaeology of African American and Consumer Culture. Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York, New York.Google Scholar
  26. Rawick, George P. (ed.) 1977 The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography. Supplement. Series 2, Vol. 16. Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Ohio, Virginia, and Tennessee Narrative. Greenwood Press, Westport, Connecticut.Google Scholar
  27. Resteaux, Capt. E.B.W. 1864 Letter to Maj. Gen. M.C. Meigs, December 16, 1864. National Archives, Military Records, RG 92, Entry 225, Box 720. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  28. Scofield, Rev. Abisha 1864 Testimony to Capt. E.B.W. Restieaux, December 16, 1864. National Archives, Military Records, RG 92, Entry 225, Box 720. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  29. Sears, Richard 2002 Camp Nelson, Kentucky: A Civil War History. University Press of Kentucky, Lexington.Google Scholar
  30. Smith, John David 1974 The Recruitment of Negro Soldiers in Kentucky, 1863–1865. Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 72(4):364–390.Google Scholar
  31. Stewart, Beth K. and W. Stephen McBride 1994 Camp Nelson Preservation and Management Plan. University of Kentucky Program for Cultural Resource Assessment, Report No. 346, Lexington.Google Scholar
  32. Thomas, Brig. Gen. Lorenzo 1864 Orders No.24, July 6, 1864. National Archives, Military Records, RG 92, Entry 225, Box 720. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  33. Vetter, John 1864 Testimony to Capt. E.B.W. Restieaux, December 16, 1864. National Archives, Military Records, RG 92, Entry 225, Box 720. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  34. Wilkie, Laurie A. 1995 Magic and Empowerment on the Plantation: An Archaeological Consideration of African-American World View. Southeastern Archaeology 14(2):136–148.Google Scholar
  35. Young, Amy 1996 Archaeological Evidence of African-Style Ritual and Healing Practices in the Upland South. Tennessee Anthropologist 21:139–155.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Camp Nelson Civil War Heritage ParkNicholasvilleUSA

Personalised recommendations