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Nutrition Labeling

  • Lloyd E. Metzger
Chapter
Part of the Food Analysis book series (FSTS)

Abstract

Nutrition labeling regulations differ in countries around the world. The focus of this chapter is on nutrition labeling regulations in the USA, as specified by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). A major reason for analyzing the chemical components of foods in the USA is nutrition labeling regulations. Nutrition label information is not only legally required in many countries, but also is of increasing importance to consumers as they focus more on health and wellness.

Keywords

Health Claim Protein Efficiency Ratio Nutrition Label Eating Occasion Reference Daily Intake 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Dairy ScienceSouth Dakota State UniversityBrookingsUSA

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