Food Analysis pp 317-349 | Cite as

Analysis of Food Contaminants, Residues, and Chemical Constituents of Concern

  • Baraem Ismail
  • Bradley L. Reuhs
  • S. Suzanne Nielsen
Chapter
Part of the Food Analysis book series (FSTS)

Abstract

The food chain that starts with farmers and ends with consumers can be complex, involving multiple stages of production and distribution (planting, harvesting, breeding, transporting, storing, importing, processing, packaging, distributing to retail markets, and shelf storing) (Fig. 18.1). Various practices can be employed at each stage in the food chain, which may include pesticide treatment, agricultural bioengineering, veterinary drug administration, environmental and storage conditions, processing applications, economic gain practices, use of food additives, choice of packaging material, etc. Each of these practices can play a major role in food quality and safety, due to the possibility of contamination with or introduction (intentionally and nonintentionally) of hazardous substances or constituents. Legislation and regulation to ensure food quality and safety are in place and continue to develop to protect the stakeholders, namely farmers, consumers, and industry. [Refer to reference (1) for information on regulations of food contaminants and residues.]

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Baraem Ismail
    • 1
  • Bradley L. Reuhs
    • 2
  • S. Suzanne Nielsen
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Food Science and NutritionUniversity of MinnesotaSt. PaulUSA
  2. 2.Department of Food SciencePurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA

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