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Gender Identity Disorder: Concerns and Controversies

  • Kate Richmond
  • Kate Carroll
  • Kristoffer Denboske

Abstract

Gender identity disorder (GID) remains the focus of considerable debate and, arguably, has divided interested parties (including health providers, transgendered people, transsexual people, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and questioning community members) into different camps of thought regarding reform of the diagnosis.

Keywords

Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Gender Dysphoria Gender Identity Disorder Gender Identity Disorder Transgendered People 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kate Richmond
    • 1
  • Kate Carroll
    • 2
  • Kristoffer Denboske
    • 3
  1. 1.Muhlenberg CollegeAllentownUSA
  2. 2.Big Brothers Big SistersPhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.John Jay College of Criminal JusticeNew YorkUSA

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