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Gender and Military Psychology

  • Angela R. Febbraro
  • Ritu M. Gill
Chapter

Abstract

The focus of this chapter is on major themes in research and theory in the field of gender and military psychology. The chapter includes a summary and discussion of psychological research and theory regarding selected topics in the field of gender and the military, as well as suggestions for future research.

Keywords

Sexual Harassment Military Family North Atlantic Treaty Organization Female Leader Female Officer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Angela R. Febbraro
    • 1
  • Ritu M. Gill
    • 1
  1. 1.Defence R&D CanadaTorontoCanada

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